Mar
9
2017
Heldagssymposium om prehospital akutsjukvård i Borås
Time 8:45-17:15
Location Högskolan i Borås

PreHospen vid Högskolan i Borås och Forum för Prehospital FoU i VGR bjuder in till Forskningssymposium om prehospital akutsjukvård. Under en heldag i Borås presenteras aktuella projekt och forskningsresultat inom det prehospitala området till nytta för verksamheter inom larmcentral, ambulanssjukvård, akutmottagning och primärvård.

När? 9 mars 2017, kl. 8:45–17:15
Var? Sal M402, Högskolan i Borås

Prehospital akutsjukvård har genomgått stora förändringar de senaste åren. I takt med att vården blivit allt mer avancerad och kvalificerad har forskningen inom området intensifierats. Mot bakgrund av det presenterar ett 20-tal forskare, doktorander och studenter sina projekt och forskningsresultat som möter vårdens utmaningar. Forskningssymposium om prehospital akutsjukvård är ett tillfälle för kompetensutveckling och utbyte för chefer och medarbetare inom olika vårdverksamheter. Det är kostnadsfritt att delta och lunch ingår.

Anmäl dig senast 23 februari. Du hittar mer information här>>

 

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Feb
9
2017
Metis Forum Intressent-träff 9 februari
Time 11:30-16:30
Location Lindholmen Science Park, Demostudion

metis_forum_webb_mini2Välkommen till nästa Metis Forum, som äger rum på eftermiddagen den 9 februari på Lindholmen Science Park.

Metis Forum är den öppna mötesplatsen där arenans intressenter träffas för kunskaps- och erfarenhetsutbyte samt tar fram idéer till projekt. Ett trettiotal intressenter från sjukvård, näringsliv och akademi deltar i arenan idag. Vi välkomnar fler som har ett intresse av att använda IT på bästa sätt inom prehospital vård, till exempel ambulanssjukvård. Kontakta gärna programansvarige Bengt-Arne Sjöqvist för mer information bengt.arne.sjoqvist@lindholmen.se

Läs mer och anmäl dig här>>

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Jan
26
2017
MTW lunch seminar with professor Paul Meaney on Microwave Tomography: Translation to the Clinic
Time 11:30-12:30 (13:00 incl. lunch)
Location Hjärtats Aula, Vita stråket 12, Sahlgrenska University Hospital

Paul MeaneyThere has been a wide range of interest and hype surrounding microwave imaging for a number of decades. Much of the interest has centered in academia and especially in the numerical modeling realm. The major motivations are that tissue dielectric properties can be remarkably specific and that microwave radiation is nonionizing. For instance, breast tumors generally have higher dielectric properties than normal breast tissue – a possible mechanism for cancer detection.

In addition, recent studies show that bone dielectric properties change with bone density – a possible alternate to x-ray densitometry for monitoring bone loss. Blood properties are different than those for brain tissue – possible applications in stroke diagnosis. These are only a few potential medical applications.

Professor Paul Meaney´s group is one of the only groups in the world to have an actual working tomography system in the clinic. A large part of this success is related to the unconventional and counterintuitive antenna array they use. This development has been a unique synergism of hardware and software expertise which has allowed them to perform hundreds of patient breast exams along with a small pilot study looking at bone screening.

At this seminar, Meaney will briefly discuss some of the more daunting implementation challenges and how they’ve addressed them. This will include their unique algorithmic approach, which now allows them to reconstruct images from exams in only a few minutes compared to hours to days for other modeling groups. In addition, this approach has allowed them to apply a fairly simple hardware configuration that keeps the number of antennas and transmit/receive pairs to a minimum and dramatically impacts the overall system cost. Complementing this design, they’ve also directly addressed multi-path signal interference problems which plague most system implementations. Professor Meaney will show some images from his clinical system including a variety of breast cancer detection and therapy monitoring examples.

Inside of the system

Image shows the isolated inside of the system.

Dr. Paul Meaney´s research has focused mainly on microwave tomography which exploits the many facets of dielectric properties in tissue and other media. His principle interest over the last decade has been in the area of breast cancer imaging where his group was the first to translate an actual system into the clinic. His team has published several clinical studies in various settings including: (a) breast cancer diagnosis, (b) breast cancer chemotherapy monitoring, (c) bone density imaging, and (d) temperature monitoring during thermal therapy. Dr. Meaney holds 10 patents, has co-authored 70 peer-reviewed journal articles, co-written one textbook and presented numerous invited papers related to microwave imaging.

BIOGRAPHY: Dr. Paul Meaney received AB’s in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science from Brown University in 1982. He earned his Masters Degree in Microwave Engineering from the University of Massachusetts in 1985 and worked in the millimeter-wave industry at companies including Millitech, Aerojet Electrosystems and Alpha Industries. He received his PhD from Dartmouth College in 1995 and spent two years as a postdoctoral fellow including one year at the Royal Marsden Hospital in Sutton, England. His research has focused mainly on microwave tomography which exploits the many facets of dielectric properties in tissue and other media. His principle interest over the last decade has been in the area of breast cancer imaging where his group was the first to translate an actual system into the clinic. His team has published several clinical studies in various settings including: (a) breast cancer diagnosis, (b) breast cancer chemotherapy monitoring, (c) bone density imaging, and (d) temperature monitoring during thermal therapy. He has also explored various commercial spin-off concepts such as detecting explosive liquids and non-invasively testing whether a bottle of wine has gone bad. He has been a Professor at Dartmouth since 1997, a professor at Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden since 2015, and is also President of Microwave Imaging System Technologies, Inc. which he co-founded with Dr. Keith Paulsen in 1995. Dr. Meaney holds 10 patents, has co-authored 70 peer-reviewed journal articles, co-written one textbook and presented numerous invited papers related to microwave imaging.

Dr. Paul Meaney´s research has focused mainly on microwave tomography which exploits the many facets of dielectric properties in tissue and other media. His principle interest over the last decade has been in the area of breast cancer imaging where his group was the first to translate an actual system into the clinic. His team has published several clinical studies in various settings including: (a) breast cancer diagnosis, (b) breast cancer chemotherapy monitoring, (c) bone density imaging, and (d) temperature monitoring during thermal therapy.

Dr. Meaney holds 10 patents, has co-authored 70 peer-reviewed journal articles, co-written one textbook and presented numerous invited papers related to microwave imaging.

When? 11:30-12:30 (13:00 incl. lunch) 26 January 2017
Where? Hjärtats Aula, Vita stråket 12, Sahlgrenska University Hospital

If you register before 13:00 pm on Monday 23 January, you will be served a light lunch after the seminar.
REGISTER HERE>>

VERY WELCOME!

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Jan
19
2017
Halftime seminar by Bushra Riaz: “MEG-based experimental studies and simulations of functional networks in Arousal response and Autism Spectrum Disorders”
Time 14:00-16:00
Location MedTech West Conference Room, Röda stråket 10B, Sahlgrenska University Hospital

On 19 January, Bushra Riaz is giving her half-time seminar with the title “MEG-based experimental studies and simulations of functional networks in Arousal response and Autism Spectrum Disorders”.

Where? MedTech West Conference Room, Röda stråket 10B, Sahlgrenska University Hospital
When? 14-16 pm. on Thursday 19 January, 2017

Main supervisor: Justin Schneiderman
Co-supervisor: Mikael Elam

Abstract
The focus of my PhD studies is MEG-based functional neural mechanisms in the brain and their relationship to “Arousal response” and Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). MEG allows direct registration of neural activity with millisecond precision.  Unlike electrical activity, magnetic fields of the brain are not affected by conducting tissues (cerebro-spinal fluid, skull and scalp), and thus allows for more precise localization of the sources of neural activity than is possible with electroencephalography. Thus, MEG combines high temporal (<1 ms) with moderate spatial (1 cm or less) resolution and is currently one of the most promising non-invasive techniques used to investigate brain activity—and functional neural-mechanisms in particular—in man. Recent developments towards a principally new MEG system based on high critical-temperature SQUIDs indicate further improvement in spatial resolution is possible, thereby providing a richer description of functional neural-mechanisms in the healthy and diseased brain.

This work is comprised of three activities:
1. “Arousal response”: Experimental MEG investigations to understand the neural mechanisms and networks involved in modulating individual’s response to arousing stimuli as a non-invasive biomarker in identifying their risk of developing cardiovascular disease.
2. Autism spectrum disorders (ASD): Experimental MEG investigations of ASD-related neural abnormalities in functional brain networks, with particular emphasis on brain connectivity ‘at rest’ and impaired emotion processing in viewing faces.
3. Next Generation MEG: Theoretical investigations of realistic designs for next generation MEG systems with improved information content that can lead to more robust and quantitative descriptions of functional brain networks.
As such, the aim is to combine theoretical and experimental investigations of functional neural networks that are generally relevant to clinical and neuroscience research and particularly relevant to our studies of Arousal response and ASD.

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Jan
20
2017
Master thesis presentation by Jenny Nilsson, MPBME: “Feature-based quality assessment for spoof fingerprint images”
Time 13:15
Location Lunnerummet (room 3311), Hörsalsvägen 11, 3rd floor, Chalmers

Welcome to a master thesis presentation with the title “Feature-based quality assessment for spoof fingerprint images” by Jenny Nilsson, MPBME.

When? Friday, 20 January at 13.15 pm.

Where? Lunnerummet (room 3311), Hörsalsvägen 11, 3rd floor, Chalmers

Examiner: Fredrik Kahl

 

Abstract

Fingerprint recognition has over the last decade become a natural component in modern identity management systems. As the commercial use of fingerprint recognition systems increases, the benefits from attacking such systems becomes greater. The security of a biometric system is seriously compromised if the system is unable to differentiate between a real and a counterfeit fingerprint. From this security threat a need for methods to prevent or detect such spoofing attacks has emerged. This thesis is concerned with so called liveness detection, that is the process of determining whether a captured fingerprint is fake or not. More precisely, the thesis explores different ways to assess how difficult it is to correctly classify a set of fake fingerprint images. Differences in image characteristics between the two classes are also explored. The purpose of the thesis is to design a quality assessment tool for fake fingerprint images used in the liveness algorithm development at Fingerprint Cards. The quality assessment tool aims to give an indication of how difficult a set of such ’spoof’ images are to classify based on the evaluated liveness characteristics.

In the first part of the thesis, features which differ between images of genuine and fake fingerprints are designed. Based on these designed liveness features, a support vector machine classifier is created by identifying the hyperplane model which best separates the images of living and spoof fingerprints. The quality of a spoof image data set is defined as the number of spoof images that this hyperplane model manages to classify correctly. Further, the quality of each individual spoof image is defined as the liveness probability assigned by the hyperplane model. Promising results were obtained from the quality assessment tool developed in the first part of the thesis. The spoof images that were assigned a low quality by the hyperplane model were images which easily could be differentiated from their live equivalents in a manual inspection. Conversely, the spoof images that were assigned a high quality were images in which the fingerprint patterns could not be differentiated from live fingerprint patterns. Hence, these results indicate a successfully designed spoof quality assessment. Further, it shows that manually designed liveness features can be used to estimate the spoof image quality.

 

In the second part of the thesis, a deep fine-tuned convolutional neural network is evaluated for quality assessment of spoof images. The utilized network has recently obtained state-of-the-art results in fingerprint liveness detection. If the deep neural network cannot differentiate between the live and fake images in a set, the images are considered very hard to classify. Conversely, if a shallow network easily differentiates spoof images from live images, these images are considered easy to classify. The liveness classification results obtained in the second part of the thesis were far better than expected. The fine-tuned convolutional neural network demonstrated fantastic liveness classification results by classifying all images in the test set correctly. These results imply that all the images in the set are possible to classify properly. However, the fact that the network managed to classify even the most realistic spoof images correctly with a high degree of certainty makes this network architecture unsuitable for spoof quality assessment. Differentiation between the images in the set could however possibly be obtained with a more shallow network.

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Dec
2
2016
Master thesis presentation by Jasmin Bentler, MPAPP  
Time 16:00 pm
Location Lunnerummet (room 3311), Hörsalsvägen 11, 3rd floor, Chalmers

On Friday 2 December you are welcome to attend Jasmin Bentler’s master thesis presentation with the title “Considerations on safe electrical peripheral nerve stimulation and development of an automated neurostimulator testing system”.
Supervisor: Max Ortiz Catalan
Examiner: Bengt Lennartson
 
Abstract
Current research at Chalmers and Integrum aims to give prosthesis users an artificial sensory feedback.  This thesis discusses stimulation parameter restrictions to allow for a non-damaging daily life prosthesis use. Emphasis is put on the lack of experimental human tissue results and approaches to transfer animal result data are proposed. An automated testing system for a neurostimulator used by Integrum is presented. In particular, noise treatment and different analysis approaches are employed. Individual stimulus parameters are tested as well as long time functionality over multiple hours of stimulation. Finally, by means of a basic functionality test the integral software of the neurostimulator type can be checked.
 
 
When? Friday, December 2nd at 16.00
Where? Lunnerummet (room 3311), Hörsalsvägen 11, 3rd floor, Chalmers
 

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  • Visiting address

    MedTech West
    Röda stråket 10B - "MedTech West house"
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital
    413 45 Göteborg


    Get in Touch

    Henrik Mindedal
    Director of Medtech West
    henrik.mindedal@medtechwest.se

  • Founders




    Detta projekt delfinansieras av Europeiska Unionen.